The Father of Industrial Design

Raymond Loewy

News

Jacque Loewy Assumes Chairmanship of Raymond Loewy Museum

Jacque Loewy, grandson of well-known industrial designer Raymond Loewy, recently said, "Throughout my life I have attended events celebrating my grandfather's legacy. These opportunities have been a honor and a privilege."

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Google Doodle Honors Raymond Loewy, the "Father of Industrial Design"

Today’s Google Doodle honors what would have been the 120th birthday of Raymond Loewy (1893-1986), often referred to as the “father of industrial design” who ”made products irresistible at a time when nobody really wanted to pay for anything,” as TIME once wrote.

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Loewy Estate Takes First Steps Toward Museum, Library Opening

The Estate of Raymond Loewy is proud to announce plans towards fund raising drive for the new Raymond Loewy Museum of Industrial Design-a 501c3 non-profit - to be located in Southern California.

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Biography

After a brief but promising career as a fashion illustrator, Raymond Loewy dedicated his talent to the field of industrial design. Loewy's creative genius was innate, and his effect on the industry was immediate. He literally revolutionized the industry, working as a consultant for more than 200 companies and creating product designs for everything from cigarette packs and refrigerators, to cars and spacecrafts. Loewy lived by his own famous MAYA principle - Most Advanced Yet Acceptable. He believed that, "The adult public's taste is not necessarily ready to accept the logical solutions to their requirements if the solution implies too vast a departure from what they have been conditioned into accepting as the norm."

A popular lecturer as well, Loewy spoke at institutions such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Columbia University, and the University of Leningrad. He founded three design companies: Raymond Loewy and Associates, New York; Raymond Loewy International, London; and Compagnie de I'Esthetique Industrielle, Paris. His writings include The Locomotive: Its Aesthetics (1937), the autobiography Never Leave Well Enough Alone (1951) and Industrial Design (1951).

A Global Presence

Raymond Loewy launched his career in industrial design in 1929 when Sigmund Gestetner, a British manufacturer of duplicating machines, commissioned him to improve the appearance of a mimeograph machine. In three days 28-year-old Loewy designed the shell that was to encase Gestetner duplicators for the next 40 years. In the process, he helped launch a profession that has changed the look of America.

The Gestetner duplicator was the first of countless items transformed by streamlining, a technique that Loewy is credited with originating. Calling the concept "beauty through function and simplification," Loewy spent over 50 years streamlining everything from postage stamps to spacecrafts. His more famous creations include the Lucky Strike cigarette package, the GG1 and S1 locomotives, the slenderized Coca-Cola bottle, the John F. Kennedy memorial postage stamp, the interior of Saturn I, Saturn V, and Skylab, the Greyhound bus and logo, the Shell International logo, the Exxon logo, the U.S. Postal Service emblem, a line of Frigidaire refrigerators, ranges, and freezers, and the Studebaker Avanti, Champion and Starliner.

By 1951, his industrial design firm was so prolific that he was able to claim, "the average person, leading a normal life, whether in the country, a village, a city, or a metropolis, is bound to be in daily contact with some of the things, services, or structures in which R.L.A [Raymond Loewy Associates] was a party during the design or planning stage."

Changing the marketplace

While Loewy established his reputation as a designer, he boosted his profession by showing the practical benefits to be derived from the application of functional styling. In the book Industrial Design, Loewy notes, "Success finally came when we were able to convince some creative men that good appearance was a salable commodity, that it often cut costs, enhanced a product's prestige, raised corporate profits, benefited the customer and increased employment."

One of Loewy's first major successes, a Coldspot refrigerator he designed for Sears Roebuck & Company in 1934, served as a testimonial to creative packaging. Loewy's streamlined Coldspot, complete with the first ever rustproof aluminum shelves, sent Sears refrigerator sales from 60,000 units to 275,000 units in just two years. Another Loewy design, the GG-1 electric locomotive built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1936, demonstrated on an even larger scale the efficacy of industrial design. The welded shell of the GG-1 eliminated tens of thousands of rivets, resulting in improved appearance, simplified maintenance, and reduced manufacturing costs. As the first welded locomotive ever built, the GG-1 led to the universal adoption of the welding technique in their construction.

Several years earlier, in 1930, Loewy had been brought on as a consultant to the Hupp Motor Company. He called the Hupp contract "the beginning of industrial design as a legitimate profession," explaining that it was "the first time a large corporation accepted the idea of getting outside advice in the development of their products." The Hupp contract also marked the beginning of Loewy's long and often frustrating association with American automobile manufacturers.

A rocky road

While Loewy introduced slanted windshields, built-in headlights and wheel covers for automobiles, he also advocated lower, leaner and more fuel-efficient automobiles long before fuel economy became a concern. "He waged a long war against the worst extravagances of Detroit styling," commented Edward Lucie-Smith a Times Literary Supplement. "He could take a production-line monster and make it an infinitely better-looking 'special,' with comparatively minor rebuilding. What he could not do was to alter the industry's fundamental attitudes. Gas-guzzlers remained gas-guzzlers, and no fancy-pants designer was going to be allowed to change that."

In 1961, while designing the Avanti, Loewy posted a sign that said, "Weight is the enemy." The Avanti design eliminated the grill, which he argued, "In this age of fuel shortages you must eliminate weight. Who needs grills? Grills I always associate with sewers."

In spite of the differences that Loewy had with Detroit stylists, several of his designs are now considered automobile classics, including the 1953 Studebaker Starliner Coupé and 1963 Avanti. In 1972 a poll of stylists representing the Big Three automakers named one of his works an industry best. Reporting the results, Automotive News announced, "The 1953 Studebaker, a long-nosed coupe, with little trim and an air of motion about it, was acclaimed the top car of all time."

Visual retention

In addition to his achievements in the transportation field, Loewy was undoubtedly among the world's most talented commercial artists. He began designing packaging and logos in 1940 when George Washington Hill, then president of the American Tobacco Company, wagered him $50,000 that he could not improve the appearance of the already familiar green and red Lucky Strike cigarette package. Accepting the challenge, Loewy began by changing the package background from green to white, thereby reducing printing costs by eliminating the need for green dye. Next he placed the red Lucky Strike target on both sides of the package, increasing product visibility and ultimately product sales. A satisfied Hill paid off the bet, and for over 40 years the Lucky Strike pack has remained unchanged.

"I'm looking for a very high index of visual retention," Loewy explained of his logos. "We want anyone who has seen the logotype even fleetingly to never forget it." Among Loewy's highly visible logotype designs are those for Shell Oil Company, Exxon, Greyhound and Nabisco.

European appeal

Loewy has also left his mark on the area of store design. One of his early innovations, the first fully climate-controlled, windowless department store, was so well received that the Loewy organization formed a separate division devoted entirely to store design. Under the leadership of Loewy's partner, William Snaith, the company designed for prestigious clients such as Saks Fifth Avenue, J. L. Hudson, Macy's, J.C. Penney, Bloomingdale's and Lord & Taylor.

By the 1970s Loewy's New York office was engaged almost exclusively in store design. Loewy decided to sell the American company and to transfer the base of his design activities to Europe, because he said store design had "never been my particular field." Retaining the name Raymond Loewy International, he started a new firm in Friebourg, Switzerland, and accelerated existing operations in London and Paris. He discovered fertile ground for his interests, saying in an interview that, "industrial design in Europe is where it was in the United States 25 years ago." Loewy's efforts overseas found great success, and his Raymond Loewy International, now Loewy Group, is the largest firm of its kind in Europe.

Out of this world

A New York Times Book Review critic once commented, "Mr. Loewy has indeed changed the shape of the modern world." However, after the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) solicited his skills, he was able to extend his range of influence even farther.

From 1967 to 1973 Loewy was retained by NASA as a habitability consultant for the Saturn-Apollo and Skylab projects. They needed him "to help insure the psycho-physiology safety and comfort of the astronauts" under the "exotic conditions of zero-gravity." His innovations, including simulating conditions of gravity and a porthole for vision contact with earth, made it possible for three men to inhabit a space capsule for 90 days. George Mueller, NASA's deputy administrator for manned space flight, wrote in a letter of appreciation: "I do not believe that it would have been possible for the Skylab crews to have lived in relative comfort, excellent spirits and outstanding efficiency had it not been for your creative design, based on a deep understanding of human needs."

In Mueller's estimation, Loewy's efforts had "provided the foundation for man's next great step - an expedition to the planets." Loewy agreed, later citing the work he did for NASA as his most important and gratifying assignment.

A legacy rivaled by few

In 1975 the Smithsonian Institution opened The Designs of Raymond Loewy, a four-month exhibit dedicated to "the man who changed the face of industrial design." Loewy later commented, "While working closely with the Smithsonian, I was provided with the opportunity to reassess the past." And what a past it was. Loewy - businessman, educator, illustrator and author - had undoubtedly established himself as one of history's most famous and influential designers.

Loewy and Viola moved to France several years later, where they enjoyed leisurely travel and a more relaxed lifestyle. On July 14, 1986, after a period of poor health, Raymond Loewy died in Monte Carlo, Monaco. He was 92 years old.

Loewy's death sparked a worldwide media frenzy over his immeasurable talent and contributions to industrial design. New York Times reporter Susan Heller wrote, "One can hardly open a beer or a soft drink, fix breakfast, board a plane, buy gas, mail a letter or shop for an appliance without encountering a Loewy creation."

Proven time and again, Loewy's design principals continue to be relevant years after their inception. Today, he has rightly found his place in history as the Father of Industrial Design.

Career Highlights

1975 Smithsonian Institution opened The Designs of Raymond Loewy, a four-month exhibit dedicated to "the man who changed the face of industrial design."

1972 Poll of stylists representing the Big Three automakers voted his 1953 Studebaker Starliner Coupé an "industry best." Also named one of the most influential Americans by LIFE magazine.

1967 Began working as a habitability consultant to NASA.

1965 Joined the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped.

1962 After designing the Shell logo, it becomes such a recognizable icon that Shell drops its name from their advertisements.

1961 Designed the Studebaker Avanti, holding to the motto, "weight is the enemy."

1954 Designed the Greyhound bus.

1953 Designed the Studebaker Starliner Coupé, which the Museum of Modern Art later called a "work of art."

1952 Founded the Compagnie de I'Esthetique Industrielle in Paris, France.

1951 Published second design textbook, Industrial Design, and his autobiography Never Leave Well Enough Alone.

1949 Appeared on the cover of TIME magazine.

1939 Redesigned the Lucky Strike cigarette packaging.

1937 Published first book, The Locomotive: Its Aesthetics.

1936 Designed the GG-1 electric locomotive for the Pennsylvania Railroad.

1934 Designed the Coldspot refrigerator for Sears Roebuck & Company.

1930 Hired as a consultant by the Hupp Motor Company.

1929 Redesigned the Gestetner mimeograph machine. Founder and art director of Raymond Loewy, William Snaith, Inc., in New York City (later established as Raymond Loewy International).

1919 Provided popular fashion illustrations for magazines such as Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Freelanced as a window designer for department stores, including Saks Fifth Avenue and Macy's.

Exhibits

2002 Hagley Museum
"Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture"

2002 Raymond Loewy Foundation
"Raymond Loewy - Tokyo Exhibition"

2001 Raymond Loewy Foundation
"Raymond Loewy - Palm Springs Exhibition"

1998 Library of Congress
"Raymond Loewy - American Treasures"

1991 Centre Goerges Pompidou, Paris
"Raymond Loewy"

1990 Internationalen Design Zentrums, Berlin
"Raymond Loewy - Pionior des Amerikanischen Industrie-design"

1983 Philadelphia Museum of Art
"The Designs of Raymond Loewy" and "Design Since 1945"

1975 Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
"Raymond Loewy: A Retrospective"

1971 Centre de Creation Industrielle, Paris
"Le Design of Raymond Loewy"

1949 Detroit Institute of Arts
"An Exhibition for Modern Living"

Clients

A-Ch

Abraham & Straus
ACF Industries
Admiral
Aerotrain
Aireon
Air France
Albert Heijn
Albert Parvin
Alfa Laval
Allied Breweries
Allied Chemical
Amana Refrigeration
Ambassador Scotch Whisky
American Banner Lines
American Brake Shoe
American Can
American Car & Foundry
American Cyanamid
American Export Isbrandtsen
American Express
American Hard Rubber
American Hardware
American Locker
American Machine & Foundry
American News
American Oil
American President Lines
American Rocket Society
American Safety Razor
American Secretariat
American Telephone & Telegraph
American Tobacco
Andrew Jergins
Angelique
Ansco
Ansul Chemical
A.O.I.P.
Aqua Tec
Arcadia Fisheries
Arketex Ceramic
Armour
Arnould
Artcraft Venetian Blind
Arvin Industries
Asahi Breweries
Associated Dry Goods
Atlas Chemical Industries
Audemar
Auer
Austin Motors
Automatic Canteen
Automatic Radio
Avanti
Avco
Avions Marcel Dassault
Azur Plastique

Baignol & Farjon
Baldwin Locomotives
Baranne
Baroclem
Baumgartner
Beckman Instruments
Beechams
Belin
Bell Aerospace
Bell Aircraft
Ber-Design
Berkel
Bernardaud
Bertin
Best & Co.
Best Foods
Bières Basse Yutz
Biltmore Hotel
Birmingham Sound
Biscottes Saint-Luc
Blanchaud
Bloomingdale's
Blue Bell
Boeing Airplane
Bonwit Teller
Borg-Erickson
Bowater Scott
Bremshey
Bristol-Myers
British Aircraft
British International Paper
British Motor
British Petroleum
Britvic
Broadway-Hale Stores
Broil-Quik
Brown-Forman Distillers
Brown & Polson
Brunswick-Balke-Callender
Brush Instruments
Brush-O-Dent
BSR
Buitoni
Bulova Watch
Butterick Publications

Cadbury Chocolates
Caem-Mercedes
Caloric
Campari
Campbell's Soups
Canada Dry
Canadair
Canadian National Railway
Canadian Pacific Railway
Carillo Coffeemakers
Carling Breweries
Carrier Air Conditioning
Carteret
Carter Products
Castel-Joyeux
Ca-Va-Seul
Celanese
Celotex
Central Rubber & Steel
CGE-FAEM
Chaffoteaux et Maury
Chandler-Evans
Charmilles
Chicorée Leroux
Chrysler
Chubb

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Ci-G

Cigarettes Laurens
C.I.M.
City Stores
Claude, Paz & Visseaux
Clement Gaget
Cleo
Clopay
Coca-Cola
Cockshutt Farm Equipment
Cognac Martell
Cointreau
Colgate-Palmolive
Colonial Radio
Computer Terminal
Concorde
Congespirin
Conord
Consolidated Aircraft
Contigea-Buhler
Continental Baking
COOP
Cooper Alloy
Cormac Photocopy
Cornell-Dubilier Electronics
Corona
Cotelle & Foucher
Country Togs
Cramer Controls
Crompton & Knowles
Cuenod

Daichi Busson Kaisha
Dayton Rubber
Dayton's
De Bijenkorf
De Dietrich
Delaware & Hudson Railroad
Délico
Delta Electric
Despar
Diamond
Dictaphone
Dictograph Products
Diebold
Diehl
Documat
Douglas Aircraft
Dow Chemical
Drackett
Dröste
Drummond
DuPont, E.I., de Nemours
Dynatra

Eagle Food Centers
Eagle Pencil
Echo de la Mode
Ed. Schuster & Co.
Ekco Products
Electric Boat
Electro Mechanical Research
Elgorriaga
Emerson Radio
Emporium
E.M.R.
Enger-Kress
Englebert-Uniroyal
Equitable Life Insurance
E.R. Squibb & Sons
Essex House Hotel
Esterline-Angus Instrument
Euromarche
Everitube
Eversharp
Exposition Internationale de Bruxelles
Exxon

Fabergé
Fairbanks, Morse
Fairbanks Whitney
Fairchild Engine & Airplane
Fairchild Recording Equip.
Famous-Barr
Fanta Beverage
Fasan Durasharp
Fedders
Federal Enameling & Stamping
Federal Pacific Electric
Federated Dept. Stores
Feudor
Fichet-Bauche
Filene's
Firestone Tire & Rubber
First National City Bank
Fobrux
Foley Brothers
Ford Motor
Formica
Fostoria Glass
Franklin Aluminium
Fred Harvey
Frigidaire
Frimotor-Westinghouse
F. & R. Lazarus
Fruidor
F. Schumacher
Fujiya Confectionery

Galleries Lafayette
Garnier
Gayfer's
General Aniline & Film
General Concentrates
General Electric
General Fireproofing
General Foods
General Motors
General Time
Gestetner
Gillette Safety Razor
Gimbel's
Glenlivet Distillers
Glenn Martin Aircraft
Godin
Gold Seal
Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Greyhound
Grey-Poupon
Grumman Aircraft Engineering
GTO Records
Guigoz
Guinness

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H-Mi

Hahne & Co.
Halle Bros.
Hallmark Cards
Hanes Hosiery
Hanovia Chemical
Haus Neuerburg
Heinz
Hénaff et Fils
Henry Morgan & Co.
Hess Chemical
Higbee's
Higgins Boat
Hills Bros. Coffee
Hilton Hotels
Hoover
Horn Convecteurs
Horten
Hotpoint
Howard Hughes Aircraft
Huber
Hudnut-DuBarry
Hupmobile

I.B.M.
Ideal Standard
Ideax
IDV
Imperial Desk
Independent Telephone
Indian Head Hosiery
Intercontinental Hotels
International Harvester
International Paper
Interstate Motor Freight Systems
ITM/Capital Tea

Jacobs Kaffee
Japanese Tobacco Monopoly
J.A. Ragland's
J.B. Ivey & Co.
J.B. White
J.C. Penney
J. Home & Co.
J.J. Newberry
J.L. Hudson
Job
John Bressmer
John Lewis
Johns-Manville
Johnson & Johnson
John Wanamaker
Joseph Magnin
Joy Mfg.
J.W. Robinson

Kaiser Aluminium & Chemical
Karstadt
Kelvinator Fooderama
Kennedy Foundation
Kimberly-Clark
Klein's
K.L.M. Airlines
Knorr
Koehler Mfg.
Kroger
Kuhn, Loeb & Co.

Laboratories Roussel-UCLAF
Lancia
Lenders, Frary & Clark
Landmark Farm Cooperatives
L. Bamberger
Lebaudy Sommier
Le Creuset
Le Dauphin
Lefèvre-Utile
Lesieur-Cotelle
Lever Bros.
Levis
Lewisburg Furniture
Liebig
Liebmann Breweries
Lightolier
Lily-Tulip Cup
Limoges-Castel
Link Aviation
Lockheed Aircraft
Long Island Railroad
Looza
Lord & Taylor
Lorraine Bauer
L.S. Ayres
Lucent
Lucky Stores
Lummus
Lustucru

Maille
Mandel Bros.
Manning, Maxwell & Moore
Marina America
Mars Confectionery Works
Martougin
Marumiya
Marwell Construction
Masonware
Massey-Ferguson
Matson Lines
Mattel
May Dept. Stores
McCray Refrigerator
Meier & Frank
Menier
Mercantile Stores
Merlite Industries
Mesberg
Metric Hosiery
Metropolitan Builders
Michael Reese Hospital
M.I.C. Transpallette
Miko
Miller & Rhoades
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator
Missouri-Pacific Railroad
Mitsui

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Mo-Se

Mobil Oil
Monoprix
Monorail Rapid Transit System
Monsanto
Monsieur Henri Wines
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
Moore-McCormick Lines
Morley Furniture
Moskvitch Automobiles
Mosler Safe
Motta

Nabisco
NASA
Nashua
National Airlines
National Boat
National Brush
National Dairy Products
National Distillers & Chemical
NBC
Nesco
Nestlé
Neue Warenhaus AG
New Man
Newsweek
New York Telephone
Niemeijer
Nobel-Bozel
Norcross
Nord Aviation
Norfolk & Western Railway
Normacem
North American Van Lines
Northeast Airlines
Northern Pacific Railway
Northrop
Northwest Aeronautical
Nova
Noyama
Nutone
Nutrilite Products

O'Cedar
Oertel Brewing
Ogilvie Flour Mills
Ohrbach's
O'Keefe's Brewing
Omar
Omega Watch
Orchard King
Oreal
Origny Sugar
Owens-Corning
Owens Staple-Tied Brush

Panama Lines
Pantasote
Parein
Parfums Weil
Paris-Rhone
Paymaster
Peace Corps
Pearson Pharmacal
Peck & Peck
Pennsylvania Railroad
Pepsodent
Perret Jaunet
Perrochet
Pharmacraft Laboratories
Philadelphia Sunday Bulletin
Philip Morris Tobacco
Phillips Petroleum
Picker X-Ray
Pied-Selle
Pioneer Rubber
Pitney-Bowes
Plastic Omnium
Plastimonde
Plymouth Shops
Poulain
Priba
Printemps
Procter & Gamble
Proctor-Silex
Purity Stores

Quaker Oats

Rank Hovis McDougall
Reddi-Whip
Renault
Republic Aviation
Restaurant Associates
Revlon
Rheingold Breweries
R.H. Macy
Rhone-Progil
Rich's
Rival Mfg.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco
Roberk
Rod Pickard Yachts
Roehr Products
Rogers Brothers
Rogers Peet
Romanet
Roneo
Rootes Motors
Rosenthal-Block China
Rotet-Pano
Royal McBee
Rudd-Melikian

Sable
Saks Fifth Avenue
Sanger-Harris
Sarma
Sartel
Savannah Sugar Refining
Schenley Industries
Schick
Schieffelin & Co.
Schlage Lock
Schneider
Scott-Atwater
Seagram Distillers
Sealtest
Sears, Roebuck
Seita
Seneca Textile
Servo
Seth Thomas Clocks

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Sh-Z

Shell International
Sikorsky Aircraft
Simca-Someca
Simmons
Singer Sewing Machine
S.N. Pétroles d'Aquitairie
Southern Pacific
Spar International
S. & S. Corrugated Paper
Standard Brands
Standard Cap & Seal
Standard Motor
Standard Oil
Standard Packaging
State Mutual Life
Steinberg's
Stewart Dry Goods
Stix-Baer & Fuller
Stouffer
Studebaker-Packard
Studio Opéra
Suchard Chocolate
Sud-Aviation
Sunbeam
Sun Oil
Super Market Institute
Sure Save
Swivelier
Synergie

Tata Air Lines
Tavaro/Elna
Taylor Instrument
Tekni-Craft
Teletype
Terraillon
Testut
Texaco
Textron
Thompson Products
Thor Power Tool
Threshers
Tintair
Titmus Optical
Tom Thumb Super Markets
Torsion Balance
Total Oil
Tracerlab
Transair
TWA

Uhu Werke Fismar
Ulis Supermarche
Uncle Ben
Unicliffe
Unilever
Union Carbide
Union de Brasseries
Union News
Union Switch & Signal
Unipol
United Aircraft
United Air Lines
United Music
United Parcel Service
U.S. Steel

Vandemoortele
Vender Elst
Vanguard
Vendo
Verzinkerei Zug
Viandox
Viking Air Conditioning
Virginia Ferry
Vitos
Viva
Volvic
Vulcan Radiator
Vultee Aircraft
Vynckier Frères

Wagons-Lits
Waldorf-Astoria
Wallace Silversmiths
Waring Products
Weber & Heilbroner
Weber Showcase & Fixture
Welle
Wellington Sears
Western Engineering
Westinghouse Electric
West Virginia Pulp & Paper
Weyerhauser
Wheeling Corrugated
Whitbread
White-Rogers
Whitney Blake
Wood Conversion
Woodward & Lothrop
W. T. Grant
Wyeth Laboratories

Zippo

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Quotes

By Raymond Loewy

"It all must start with an inspired, spontaneous idea."

"The main goal is not to complicate the already difficult life of the consumer."

"I can claim to have made the daily life of the 20th Century more beautiful."

"For our appointment, I brought along sheets of colored paper, scissors, razor blades and rubber cement. Since his desk at the Oval Office was relatively small, we just sat on the floor cutting out colored paper shapes and working out various ideas. We had three sessions lasting about an hour each and he approved a design quite similar to one of my early suggestions." - describing his working relationship with JFK

"I believe most in educated intuition, in what you get through profound experience."

"Today every city, town, or village is affected by it. We have entered the Neon Civilization and become a plastic world.. It goes deeper than its visual manifestations, it affects moral matters; we are engaged, as astrophysicists would say, on a decaying orbit."

"I alienated the automotive industry by saying that cars should be lightweight and compact.. I'd also kill chrome forever, or any other applied junk."

"It's shape is aggressively female - a quality that in merchandise, as in life, sometime transcends functionalism." -- referring to the Coca-Cola bottle shape

"Jukeboxes on wheels, aesthetic aberrations that masked the workings of the machine beneath the layers of tawdry flash."
-- commenting on Detroit chrome

"Junky stuff is consumer murder."

"Form, which should be the clean-cut expression of mechanical excellence, has become sensuous and organic."

"I believe one should design for the advantage of the largest mass of people, first and always. That takes care of ideologies and sociologies. I think one also should try to elevate the aesthetic level of society. And to watch quality control always, while insisting others do, too."

"I waited for the S-1 to pass through at full speed. I stood on the platform and saw it coming from the distance at 120 miles per hour. It flashed by me like a steel thunderbolt, the ground shaking under me, in a blast of air that almost sucked me into its whirlwind. Approximately a million pounds of locomotive were crashing through near me. I felt shaken and overwhelmed by an unforgettable feeling of power, by a sense of pride at what I had helped to create. I had, after all, contributed something to a great nation that had taken me in and that I loved so deeply. And I had come a long, happy way myself from my start in fashion advertising. I had found my way of life."

"Standing somewhere between New York and Philadelphia, I don't know where, and seeing that engine come at high speed, shaking the ground. It was a thrill, unforgettable. There are great the great moments in a man's life..."

"As an American citizen who still loves his native country, France, it is heartwarming to see that this country appreciates the beauty and taste that all Frenchmen prize."

"Industrial design keeps the customer happy, his client in the black and the designer busy."

"Design, vitalized and simplified, will make the comforts of civilized life available to an ever-increasing number of Americans."

"Between two products equal in price, function and quality, the one with the most attractive exterior will win."

"I once said that the most difficult things to design are the simplest. For instance, to improve the form of a scalpel or a needle is extremely difficult, if not impossible. To improve the appearance of a threshing machine is easy. There are so many components on which one can work."

"There is a frantic race to merchandise tinsel and trash under the guise of 'modernism.'"

"We know that logic alone does not sell automobiles, so its immediate appeal is emotional; sheer elegance and design finesse, the wish to feel its slender curves, to love that car, to be known as its discriminating owner."

"As a boy I had liked both drawing and physics, and I always abhorred the role of being a spectator. In 1908, when I was 15, I designed, built and flew a toy model airplane which won the then-famous James Gordon Bennett Cup.. By 16 I had discovered that design could be fun and profitable, and this lesson has never been lost on me."

"We didn't realize what the repercussions might be decades later.. America became flooded by cheap, sleazy junk bought by consumers who saw gaudiness as a mark of advanced 'futuristic' design."

"I sought excitement and, taking chances, I was all ready to fail in order to achieve something large."

"In many cases it is hypocrisy for the designer to talk of 'functional design' when they have become too fat with too many facilities, too many materials which they use wastefully."

"It would seem that more than function itself, simplicity is the deciding factor in the aesthetic equation. One might call the process beauty through function and simplification."

"Style for the sake of style alone will have less meaning to the consumer than value. An interruption of the spiral created by boosting sales from year to year with false inducements of style, bulk and flash gives design a new lease on life. Aesthetic beauty will be the direct result of careful planning and precision manufacturing."

"A designer must always think about the unfortunate production engineer who will have to manufacture what you have designed; try to understand his problems."

"The most beautiful curve is a rising sales graph."

"I believe most in educated intuition."

"It all starts with an inspired, spontaneous idea."

"Junky stuff is consumer murder."

"Good design is not an applied veneer."

"Beauty through function and simplification."

"It's a simple exercise; a little logic, a little taste, and the will to cooperate."

"First and foremost we apply our creativity to generating ideas."

"More than function itself, simplicity is the deciding factor in the aesthetic equation."

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About Raymond Loewy

"Loewy keeps one eye on the imagination and one eye on the cash register." -- Charles Luckman, Lever Brothers

"Loewy has probably affected the daily life of more Americans than any other man of his time." -- Cosmopolitan magazine, 1950

"A blend of stylist, engineer and poll taker, the designer operates in the mysterious sphere of popular taste and prejudice. His tools are color, shape, texture." -- John Kobler, Time magazine

"From toothbrushes to automobiles, Raymond Loewy's streamlined designs of thousands of consumer goods and their packaging radically changed the look of American life." -- The New York Times

"Through his talent, the force of his personality, his charm, his energy, his flair, his Parisian air, his genius for promoting himself and his profession, and his ability to intermediate so well between so many worlds, Raymond Loewy bestrode the profession he had helped created. More than any other individual, he was responsible for convincing business of the importance of design." -- Glenn Porter, Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture

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Endorsements

Air France


Coquelle Oven

Howrey Law

NEWMAN

Onlin Cellohpane

Rolex

Schumachers

Awards

2001 Citizen of Honor of Palm Springs

2000 Best Design of 20th Century, 1st Runner-up, S1 Locomotive

1997 Automotive Hall of Fame

1989 Designers Hall of Fame

1986 Lycee College Raymond Loewy, 23300 La Souterraine, France, named for Loewy

1982 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, Royal College of Art, London

1980 Grand Officer of the Legion of Honor, Medallion, Paris, at US Embassy

1978 Special Award of Merit, American Society of Industrial Design

1970 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, Arts Center College of Design, Los Angeles, Calif.
Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, California Institute of Design

1969 Special Honoree Award "Joy of Living", American Society of Industrial Design

1967 Citizen of Honor of Palm Springs

1966 Citizen of Honor of New York City

1964 Graphic Arts Certificate of Achievement, Artist Guild of Philadelphia Jacqueline Kennedy asks Loewy to design JFK memorial stamp Citizen of Honor of France

1960 Benjamin Franklin Fellow, British Royal Society of Arts, London

1959 French Legion of Honor, Silver Cup, Commander

1956 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, University of Cincinnati

1954 2 Certificates of Recognition, US Foreign Operations Administration

1950 Citizen of Honor of Chicago

1949 First American designer to meet with Japanese emperor and prime minister

1946 Fellow of the American Society of Industrial Design

1942 Made officer of French Legion of Honor, Silver Cup Fellow of the British Royal Society of Arts, London

1939 Royal Designer to Industry of the British Royal Society of Arts, London

1938 American Design Award for S1 locomotive design, New York

1937 Gold Medal in Transportation, Paris World Exhibition for GG1 locomotive design

1934 Office of the Year, Office on permanent display at Metropolitan Museum of Art

1914-1919 Croix de Guerre Medal (French Cross of War) with 4 citations and the Interallied Medal, for military service in WWI

Other Honors:

First Habitability Consultant to NASA for the Saturn-Apollo program, Skylab and Shuttle Orbiter Projects.

"The 100 Events That Shaped America" list established by the Historian-in-Chief of the Smithsonian Institute on the occasion of the US Bicentennial in 1976, included in the section "Inventors and shaping of everyday life". Those listed were: the Wright Brothers, Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, Lindbergh, Henry Ford and Raymond Loewy.

Loewy's 1951 autobiography "Never Leave Well Enough Alone" becomes a best seller and is translated into French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Japanese and Arabic.

Fast Facts

Famous Tag Line: "The Man Who Shaped America", "The Father of Streamlining", "The Father of Industrial Design"

Height: 5 feet 10 inches

Weight: 170 lbs.

Hair: Dark Brown

Eyes: Blue

Nickname: "Lucky Raimon"

Race: Caucasian

Religion: Catholic

Occupation: Industrial Designer

Date & Place of Birth: November 5, 1893, Paris

Date & Place of Death: July 14, 1986, Monaco

Burial Location: Rochefort-en-Yvelines, near Rambouillet, France

Favorites

Actors: Friends of Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Kirk Douglas, William Powell

Films: Films by Fellini, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas and Jim Henson

Food: French haute cuisine and his own famous "Scallops St. Tropez"

Colors: Beige, Black, Gold

Cars: '53 Studebaker Starliner, '62 Avanti, custom Jaguars, BMWs

Drinks: Moet and Chandon Champagne and Daiquiris

Hobbies: Scuba Diving, Boxing at the NY Athletic Club and maintaining a book of wicked humor and observations

Modern Influences

"Advertisers and clients are returning to good design. Good design began with Raymond Loewy." Laurence Loewy, 2002

Loewy Design

A business striving to reintroduce Loewy to a new generation. Visit the web site sponsored by Loewy Design at www.RaymondLoewy.org.

Raymond Loewy Foundation

The Raymond Loewy Foundation was established with the specific objectives of preserving Raymond Loewy's image and heritage and promoting the discipline of design internationally. Each year it awards the Lucky Strike Designer Award and the Lucky Strike Junior Designer Award. Past recipients include Donna Karan, Karl Lagerfeld and Michael Ballhaus. Read more by visiting the web site www.RaymondLoewyFoundation.com.

Musings About Dad

A section written by Raymond Loewy's daughter Laurence. Stories about her father and his impact on the world of design.

Learning to Drive Loewy 10/13/08

Capote, Cacti and a Dune Buggy 04/10/08

AVANTI VERTICAL 11/13/07

A Pool and a Book 10/23/07